This is the "Home" page of the "Tips for Finding Cause & Effects Sources" guide.
Alternate Page for Screenreader Users
Skip to Page Navigation
Skip to Page Content
Articles & Media Books & eBooks Help About
       

Tips for Finding Cause & Effects Sources   Tags: tips, topics  

Your best bets for cause & effect research, plus tips to save you time and get the sources you need.
Last Updated: Oct 12, 2016 URL: http://libguides.com.edu/TipsCause Print Guide RSS UpdatesEmail Alerts
Home Print Page
  Search: 
 

Cause & Effect Databases

These database are great for cause & effect topics.

  • CQ Researcher  
      
      Icon  Icon  Icon
    The Background section in CQ articles can be great for cause; the Current Situation section may have support for both cause and effect.
  • Infobase Learning Issues & Controversies  
      
      Icon  Icon  Icon  Icon  Icon  Icon
    If you search and find articles from the Encyclopedia, you will see a cause and/or effect section.

    Most articles are pro & con, but within each argument you may find support cause or effect.
  • Gale Opposing Viewpoints  
      
      Icon  Icon  Icon  Icon  Icon  Icon
    Browsing the topics can be a great way to help you come up with a topic, but searching for your topic with the term "causes of" or "effects of" or the phrases in the chart is the best way to get articles in this databases to support your paper.

    Some articles are pro & con, but within each argument you may find support cause or effect.
  • Gale Science in Context  
      
      Icon  Icon  Icon  Icon  Icon  Icon  Icon  Icon  Icon  Icon
    Browsing the topics can be a great way to help you come up with a topic, but searching for your topic with the term "causes of" or "effects of" or the phrases in the chart is the best way to get articles in this databases to support your paper.
  • ProQuest Research Library  
      
      Icon  Icon  Icon  Icon  Icon  Icon  Icon
    Searching for your topic with the term "causes of" or "effects of" or some of the chart terms or the phrases in the chart is the best way to get articles in this databases to support your paper.

    Once you search, you will want to use the subject limits under Narrow Results to the best results. Use More Options if you don't see a good subject limit.
  • Academic Search Complete  
      
      Icon  Icon  Icon  Icon  Icon
    Searching for your topic with the term "causes of" or "effects of" or some of the chart terms is the best way to get articles in this databases to support your paper.

    Once you search, you will want to use the subject limits under Refine Results to the best results. Use Show More if you don't see a good subject limit.
  • Statista  Icon  Icon
    This database provides statistics and occasionally reports rather than articles.

    Data can be accessed by searching or you can browse by industry, topic, country, digital market or infographic.
 

What are Cause & Effect Sources?

Cause and effect sources are potentially anything that has factual information.

Searching for your topic with the term "causes of" or "effects of" can be a great way to get articles in databases to support your paper, but there are other terms you can combine with your topic that may also help.

Good for Cause

Good for Effect

Good for Either

"reasons for"

why

factors

"impact of"

correlation

complications

benefits

patterns

statistics

influence

role of

associated with or association of

 

Reliability
Since you are doing college level research it's very important to make sure your source is reliable. You should read all sources critically, but you can trust the sources you can get through COM Library. See our Tips for Evaluating Information.

Finding Topics
CQ Researcher, Issues & Controversies, Opposing Viewpoints and Science in Context can also help you come up with topics by taking a look at their browse topics pages.

You Can Use Pro & Con Sources, But...
Opinion or pro & con articles, books, or other sources can used for cause & effect research assignments, but you have to be careful so as not to produce an unintentionally biased paper or presentation that is meant to be objective.

Author

Profile Image
Kathryn Park

 
Description

Loading  Loading...

Tip