Skip to main content

Cite MLA Style 7th Edition

MLA style according to the 7th edition of the MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers from the Modern Language Association.

Block Quotes in Word

MLA requires that any quotation over four lines be started on a new line, indented 1 inch from the margin, double spaced without quotation marks, essentially a block quote. Here's how:

    Once you have typed in the text you want for your block quote, hit enter before the first word of the quote and after the last word of the quote. Highlight the text Right click and select paragraph Under indent change left to 1".

How do I cite a source from another source?

In MLA style the preference is always to use the direct source if you can find it, but if you can't find the original source you can cite a source indirectly. Here's how:

Cite using normal in text citation rules for MLA, but include the phrase qtd. in. On your works cited page you will only include the source that you actually looked at. For example, an article written by Peter Holbrook cites T.S. Eliot, and you want to cite the Eliot quote as well:

Eliot's position was that the "ordinary emotional person, experiencing a work of art, has a mixed critical and creative reaction". (qtd. in Holbrook 96).

Page Number Unknown, With or Without Known Author

If there are no page numbers on your source, use the author in the parenthetical reference. If there is also no author use the title.

Example no page number:

The utilitarianism of the Victorians “attempted to reduce decision-making about human actions to a ‘felicific calculus’” (Everett).

Example no page number and no author:

"a tool that should be usable by any manager responsible for learning, without any significant cost or resource barriers" (Tools).

Author Unknown

Just as with your sources cited page, if there is no known author, you skip to the title of the work.

Example:

Many in the liquor industry argue that the ban on television liquor advertising gives those in the beer and wine industry an unfair advantage ("Liquor Advertising" 5).

Author Named within the Quotation

If you have already stated the author's name in the quotation itself, you only need the page umber in the parenthetical reference.

Example:

Litvak calls Winters’s mumbling a “labor of disarticulation” (167).

Author Not Named within the Quotation

This is one of the most common in text citations. When you are quoting an author, use the author's last name and the page number in parenthesis at the end of the sentence.

Example:

Romantic poetry is characterized by the "spontaneous overflow of powerful feelings" (Wordsworth 263).

Works Cited First

To get your in text citation, you actually need to have your Works Cited citation first. That's because your in text citation is based on your Works Cited citation. What the in text citation really does is refer your reader to the specific source on your Works Cited page.

Quotations with More Than Four Lines

MLA requires that any quotation over four lines be started on a new line, indented 1 inch from the margin, double spaced without quotation marks. At the end of the block quote include your in text citation with authors last name and page number within parenthesis.

Example:

Not to belabor the chicken-and-egg question, but what accounts for this situation? Is it merely the conventional privileging of plot in mainstream cinema and television alike that is responsible for both the supersession of original-language Shakespeare and the avoidance of substitute dialogue that might itself be construed as too literary or inventive? Is this supersession rather the predictable by-product of the accelerated displacement of language by image in contemporary visual media in general, a process that began more than one hundred years ago with the advent of silent filming. (Cartelli 29)

Quotations with Less Than Four Lines

Quotations with less then fours lines will be in the regular text of you paper, with double quotations. Right after the last quotation mark include your in text citation with authors last name and page number within parenthesis.

Example:

She stated, “The ‘placebo effect’ . . . disappeared when behaviors were studied in this manner” (Miele 276), but she did not clarify which behaviors were studied.